The Thing All Women Do That You Don’t Know About

Gwendolyn Alley aka Art Predator:

how do YOU de-escalate? what can YOU do to change it or make the situation better?

Originally posted on Drifting Through My Open Mind:

image: Shutterstock image: Shutterstock

There’s this thing that happens whenever I speak about or write about women’s issues. Things like dress codes, rape culture and sexism. I get the comments: Aren’t there more important things to worry about? Is this really that big of a deal? Aren’t you being overly sensitive? Are you sure you’re being rational about this?

Every. Single. Time.

And every single time I get frustrated. Why don’t they get it?

I think I’ve figured out why.

They don’t know.

They don’t know about de-escalation. Minimizing. Quietly acquiescing.

Hell, even though women live it, we are not always aware of it. But we have all done it.

We have all learned, either by instinct or by trial and error, how to minimize a situation that makes us uncomfortable. How to avoid angering a man or endangering ourselves. We have all, on many occasions, ignored an offensive comment. We’ve all…

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I Search You Search We All Search for Research


In chapter two of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Paulo Freire proposes teachers bring “problem posing” into the classroom. Freire argues that students have real questions for which they want answers, real problems they want to solve, real ideas they want to explore about their world. He encourages teachers to move from a transmission style of teaching to a transformative one, one that provides students with opportunities to transform their world. To do so, he suggests a process of naming, reflecting, and acting on the real world problems we face today. In Stop Stealing Dreams, Seth Godin also encourages students to get out and work on real world problems.

In this 8-10 paper, I want students to consider what they’d like to solve in the world using skills they have or want to learn then Continue reading

prosumption: from parasitic to prefigurative

Gwendolyn Alley aka Art Predator:

Some of my students who are reading Nowtopia by Chris Carlsson may find this concept of “prosumption.”

Originally posted on

Many of you practice prosumption everyday without realizing it.  If you bus your own table after a fast food meal, do self-check out at a store, or review a manuscript for an academic journal, you are engaging in simultaneous production and consumption.  Organizations are increasingly introducing prosumption into routines without corresponding compensation, or, as George Ritzer notes in his essay in this The Sociological Quarterly summer 2015 issue, savings, for the prosumer.

Here’s the start of Ritzer’s “Prosumer Capitalism” essay:

This essay involves a further, albeit still early and provisional, analysis of the relationship
between prosumption and capitalism. It is made necessary by the rapid changes
in the nature of prosumption, its relationship to the changing capitalist economic
system, as well as the growing literature on them (Piketty 2014; Rifkin 2014;
Ritzer 2014). Like its predecessor (Ritzer and Jurgenson 2010), this analysis
deals with the ever-expanding prosumption on…

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Shadow Syllabus

Gwendolyn Alley aka Art Predator:

There is a lot of Truth in this. Especially #34. And on #37? I wish. Do we want to discuss it in class?

Originally posted on Sonya Huber:

  1. IMG_3738I’ll tell you exactly how to get an A, but you’ll have a hard time hearing me.
  2. I could hardly hear my own professors when I was in college over the din and roar of my own fear.
  3. Those who aim for A’s don’t get as many A’s as those who abandon the quest for A’s and seek knowledge or at least curiosity.
  4. I had bookmarked a citation for that fact, and now I can’t find it anywhere.
  5. The only way to seek knowledge is to open your hands and let your opinions drop, but that requires even more fear.
  6. The goals and outcomes I am required to put on my syllabus make me depressed; they are the illusion of controlling what cannot be controlled.
  7. I end up changing everything halfway through the semester anyway because the plan on paper is never what the living class ends up being about.

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Know + reduce your carbon footprint! Earth Month 2015 Actions: It’s Our Turn To Lead

Gwendolyn Alley aka Art Predator:

extra credit activities? make-up absences? research materials for papers?

Originally posted on art predator:


Throughout the world, communities everywhere are celebrating April’s Earth Month, Global Citizen Day April 18, Climate Education Week April 20-25, and the 45th Earth Day (Weds April 22) with thousands of activities.

Today being TAX DAY in the US, perhaps it’s time to pay a tax to the environment? It doesn’t have to be cash: it can be an action as simple as picking up someone else’s litter or making a change in your lifestyle. Can you bring your own cup next time you buy coffee? Can you use a glass or stainless steel bottle for your water or other beverage? Can you bring your own bags to the store? Can you cut back on how much meat or processed foods you eat?

One focus of Earth Month this year is ACTION and CLIMATE;

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Rick Lupert On Poetry Super HWY 101

Gwendolyn Alley aka Art Predator:

“Rules for Poetry” a poem by Rick Lupert who reads in Ventura Th. April 9, 2015 7:30pm.

Originally posted on art predator:

It’s National Poetry Month!
Which means it’s time to get YOUR POETRY ON! And no better time than this Thurs. April 9, 2015 at 7:30pm, when Los Angeleno poet and long time Cobalt Cafe host Rick Lupert features at  the EP Foster Library in the Topping Room located at 651 E. Main Street, Ventura, CA 93001 (across from Winchesters; free parking behind the library.) Regular host Phil Taggart has stepped away from the podium leaving it in the capable hands of poet Dane Baylis. Open mic follows the featured reading; get there at 7:15pm to sign-up.

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John Twelve Hawks: “New surveillance states have placed us in an invisible prison”

John Twelve Hawks: “New surveillance states have placed us in an invisible prison”


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